Governor Perdue signs 15-day budget extension

June 30, 2009

Governor Perdue signed Senate bill 311 at 5:30 this evening, Continuing Budget Authority, which authorizes expenditures by North Carolina State Government until the close of July 15, 2009. The text of the chaptered session law, S.L. 2009-215,  is here.


House budget passed 6/13 — bill text and committee report

June 13, 2009

The House of Representatives passed Senate Bill 202 on June 13, 2009. Thirty-nine adopted floor amendments were engrossed to create the 6th edition of the bill.  Below are links to the bill as passed, its table of contents, the report from today incorporating the bill and all amendments, including budget restorations, and two committee reports from earlier in the week.

New – Bill Text – Senate Bill 202, 6th Edition Engrossed, as passed by North Carolina House of Representatives June 13, 2009 (39 amendments engrossed)

New – Table of Contents- Senate Bill 202, 6th Edition Engrossed, as passed by North Carolina House of Representatives June 13, 2009

New – Report – House of Representatives Report on the Continuation, Expansion, and Capital Budgets for Senate Bill 202, 6th Edition

  Report – House Appropriations Committee Report on the Continuation, Expansion, and Capital Budgets for Senate Bill 202, 4th Edition Engrossed (This Report is revised to incorporate all House Appropriations Committee amendments adopted June 9, 2009.)

 Report – Supplemental Report on the Continuation, Expansion and Capital Budgets and Contingent Appropriations – Senate Bill 202, 5th Edition, as Amended with Committee Amendments


House floor amendments online

June 11, 2009

House floor amendments to Senate Bill 202, 2009-2011 North Carolina State budget are scanned in and posted online at http://www.ncleg.net/gascripts/BillLookUp/BillLookUp.pl?Session=2009&BillID=s202&submitButton=Go

As of 6:50 pm Thursday, June 11, posting was up through House amendment 31, as follows.  Missing numbers were amendments withdrawn, displaced, or out of order:

06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 1
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 2
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 3
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 4
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 5
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 6
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 7
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 8
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 9
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 11
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 12
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 13
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 14
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 15
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 16
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 17
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 18
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 19
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 20
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 21
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 23
06/11/2009 House Amend Failed 24
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 25
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 26
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 27
06/11/2009 House Amend Adopted 29
06/11/2009 House Amend Failed 31

Eight days a week

June 11, 2009

While only the Beatles could have eight days a week, and with a Friday and Saturday North Carolina House session likely this week, the Charlotte Observer’s Jack Betts has a great post today about how regular daily sessions dropped from six to five to four days per week over the last 65 years.

Jack concluded his post:

Legislators once spent at least parts of six days a week in Raleigh on formal sessions; Now it’s four days a week. But, of course, with technology and staff and sophisticated ways to analyze problems, lawmakers have many more ways to be productive. And a lot of them work on legislative business seven days a week, no matter whether they’re in Raleigh, Ramp Cove or Rodanthe.


House Finance Committee action from Wednesday

June 11, 2009

The North Carolina House Finance Committee moved along Wednesday June 10, 2009 on Senate Bill 202, 2009-2011 budget approving the following, along with three smaller amendments: 


House budget bill as approved by Appropriations Committee

June 10, 2009
The 2009-2011 North Carolina state budget bill as approved by the House Appropriations Committee Tuesday June 9, 2009 can be found here.

Revised documents/House Appropriations committee

June 9, 2009

Revised documents for North Carolina House Appropriations Committee June 9, 2009:

New – REVISED Bill Text – Proposed House Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 202, 2009-2011 State Budget, to be considered June 9, 2009 in House Appropriations Committee (Section 5.7 new, Section 28.2 revised)

New – Report – Supplemental Report on the Continuation, Expansion and Capital Budgets – Supplement to Proposed House Committee Substitutefor Senate Bill 202, 3rd Edition


proposed House budget online

June 8, 2009

The North Carolina 2009-2011 budget will be considered in House Appropriations Committee Tuesday, June 9, the following items have been posted to the web:

New – Bill Text – Proposed House Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 202, 2009-2011 State Budget, to be considered June 9, 2009 in House Appropriations Committee


House appropriations subcommitee reports online

June 6, 2009

The reports presented TO the House Appropriations subcommittees on June 4, 2009 have been posted to the web by our Fiscal Research Division as follows (note, these reports may have been amended before adoption Thursday, amendments are not shown):

 

Capital

Education

Health and Human Services

Justice and Public Safety

Natural and Economic Resources

Transportation


Keeping up with bills in the end game

June 2, 2009

As bills pass both house and make there way to and fro the Governor’s office (or in the case of local bills, become law immediately), the North Carolina General Assembly has several resources to keep up with new laws:

1) Bills about to be ratified — bills are usually ratified the next legislative day after they are ordered enrolled. Ratification is the stage where bills that have passed both houses have a true copy prepared and are signed by the presiding officer of each house. They are not yet law.

2) Bills pending on the Governor’s desk (this is usually not updated for about 12 hours after the bill is delivered or comes back from the Governor.

3) Enacted laws, showing those public bills  signed by the Governor in order of  bill number,  and showing all enacted laws in order of enactment date (includes public and local), and by bill number (also includes resolutions)

You can also find here a spreadsheet showing which General Statutes and uncodified session laws have been affected by new laws and bills pending ratification


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