word of the day: Crossover (FAQ)

cross·o·ver [kraws-oh-ver, kros]

“The point at which all bills that don’t raise or spend money would have to pass one house or the other” (Binker, Capital Beat, May 13, 2007)

Crossover day at the North Carolina General Assembly was today, May 24, 2007.

 Some common misconceptions and truths:

 1) A bill has to pass by May 24, 2007, or have had a tax, fee, or appropriation in it by May 24, 2007 in order to remain eligible.  MYTH.  The test is not what was in the bill today, but what is in the bill the day that it passes the first house.

 2) If a bill is in the appropriations or finance committee today, it is exempt from crossover. MYTH.  Crossover exempt bills under the House and Senate rules are those that are REQUIRED by the rules to be referred to one or the other of those committees. Just being in one of those committees does not mean the bill was required to be there.

3) As long as the bill “had money in it” by today, it can pass the first house later without those provisions. MYTH. The test is not what was in the bill today, but what is in the bill the day that it passes the first house.

4) Even if a bill does not have a tax, fee, or appropriation in it today, it can have one added by amendment between now and adjournment and regain eligibility. TRUE.

5) There is a list of bills not subject to crossover. The bill simply needs to be on that list. MYTH. Who would have time to make up such a list? Perhaps it is hidden in the Great Pumpkin? It is true that the General Assembly staff makes up a list between the long and short sessions of what bills have met the crossover deadline, but that list is simply a list of bills that have passed one house.  The last list was issued in 2005. It is not a list of bills yet to pass one house that are still eligible until we adjourn over to 2008.

UPDATE 5/30/2007: The Research Division has posted a crossover list. This list does not include appropriations and revenue measures exempt from the crossover deadline, unless such a measure has passed from one chamber to the other by May 24, 2007. Individual analysis of the particular measure not “crossing over” is necessary to determine whether it is subject to the crossover deadline.

Stats on the 281 bills that passed one house during crossover are here.

Also see my post on how crossover was actually instituted in 1987 as a process reform measure.

=======================

2007 North Carolina Senate Rules:

RULE 41. Crossover bill deadline. – In order to be eligible for consideration by the Senate during the 2007 or 2008 Regular Sessions of the  2007 General Assembly, all House bills other than those required to be referred to the Committee on Finance or the Committee on Appropriations/Base Budget by Rule 42 or adjournment resolutions must be received and read on the floor of the Senate as a message from the House no later than  Thursday, May 24*, 2007 …” 

2007 North Carolina House Rules, as amended

Rule 31.1(d) (d)       In order to be eligible for consideration by the House during the first Regular Session, all Senate bills other than finance or appropriations bills which would be required to be re‑referred to the Appropriations or Finance Committee under Rule 38 or adjournment resolutions must be received and read on the floor of the House as a message from the Senate no later than Thursday, May 24, 2007 …”

*changed from May 17 under suspension of the rules

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2 Responses to word of the day: Crossover (FAQ)

  1. Joel Raupe says:

    Gerry: MYTH or TRUE: Local Bills that are “not controversial” can be introduced during the 2008 short session. (Follow Up?) What kids of proposals are eligible for introduction during the short session? – Thanks – JCR

  2. gercohen says:

    we don’t yet know what the rules for the short session will be. Here are the rules that have existed more or less unchanged for 25 years:

    1) bills primarily and directly affecting the budget for FY 2008-2009
    2) bills that passed one house in 2007
    3) local bills certified by the sponsor to be non-controversial, not require a public hearing, and are supported by all the members of both houses representing the area that the bill applies to
    4) a bunch of minor categories
    5) any bill authorized by a joint resolution passed by 2/3 vote in both houses (there are usually two or three of those resolutions passed each short session)

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